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dc.contributor.advisorLorlene Hoyt.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwieger, Anne (Anne Margaret)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-30T16:34:38Z
dc.date.available2009-01-30T16:34:38Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/44340
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 106).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe historical roles of public service and professional skills education in American planning curriculum has been driven in large part by institutional pressures far removed from practical application or development of new planning knowledge. The placement of scholarship grounded in service and practice along the margins of planning curriculum has led many in the academy, particularly those on planning faculties, to question both its disciplinary and professional basis. Approved by Congress in 1993, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development's Community Outreach Partnership Center (COPC) grant program sought to provide colleges and universities an actionable means of integrating professionalism and service through collaborative work with communities into their institutional agendas. Conceptions of university-community partnerships are informed largely by the prominent role of universities and community colleges as anchor institutions in the economic, social, and cultural lives of cities. University-community partnerships funded through the COPC program seek to strengthen the capacity of residents and civic leaders to improve the quality of life in their community. Engaged scholarship - the art of "connecting the rich resources of the university to our most pressing social, civic and ethical problems" - is among the most important avenues through which students, faculty and community partners convene around the pursuit of these ends.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont) The author investigated the notion of mutual benefit through engaged scholarship from the perspective of faculty members, students, community partners and community liaisons as well as her participatory experience within the MIT@Lawrence university-community partnership. Findings show that mutual benefit within these contexts is predicated upon three fundamental ethics of partnership engagement: open, honest dialogue; jointly held understanding of one another's roles and expectations; and understanding and valuing the process.Through this thesis, the author makes a case for a model of student engagement that recognizes the value of "continuity" for achieving personal and institutional transformation. By consistently and continually engaging with university and community partners over a period of two years, she argues, students can play a substantial role in transforming the priorities and functions of institutions of higher education.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Anne Schwieger.en_US
dc.format.extent106 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleIn pursuit of continuity : engaged scholarship for personal and institutional transformationen_US
dc.title.alternativeEngaged scholarship for personal and institutional transformationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc276306033en_US


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