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dc.contributor.advisorDomhnull Granquist-Fraser.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNagle, Brian J. (Brian James)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-01T15:59:47Z
dc.date.available2009-10-01T15:59:47Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/47894
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 137-140).en_US
dc.description.abstractPrecision guided targeting systems have been in use by the U.S. military for the last half-century. The desire for high targeting accuracies while maintaining minimal collateral damage has driven the implementation of guidance systems on a myriad of different platforms. Current seeker systems using global positioning system (GPS)-aided technology offer good accuracy, but are limited by an adversary's signal jamming capabilities and the dynamic nature of the military target environment. Furthermore, ultra-accurate inertial measurement units (IMU) that serve as stand-alone guidance systems are very expensive and offer no terminal guidance enhancement. As a result, it is cost prohibitive to equip some platforms with precision guidance capability. The demand for high accuracy at low cost has prompted substantial recent development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) IMU's and optical focal plane arrays (FPA). The resulting decreasing device size and production costs coupled with higher unit performance have created opportunities for implementing seeker-enabled systems on platforms previously deemed impractical. As a result, the author proposes a design methodology to develop a low-cost system while satisfying stringent performance requirements. The methodology is developed within the context of a strap-down seeker system for tactical applications. The design tenets of the optical sensor, the inertial sensor, and projectile flight dynamics were analyzed in-depth for the specific scenario. The results of each analysis were combined to formulate a proposed system.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) The system was then modeled to produce system miss distance estimates for differing engagement situations. The system demonstrated 3[sigma] miss distance estimates that were less than the maximum allowable error in each case. The system cost was tabulated and a production price was approximated. Using current technology and pricing information for the main components, the analysis shows that a system with a 3[sigma] miss distance of 0.801 m could be built for a unit price in the range of $11,730 -$19,550, depending on production costs. Design limitations are discussed, as well as strategies to improve the analysis for future consideration.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Brian J. Nagle.en_US
dc.format.extent140 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleSystem analysis and design of a low-cost micromechanical seeker systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc435528371en_US


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