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dc.contributor.authorBerman, Odeden_US
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Richard C., 1943-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFouska, Nikolettaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-28T19:28:02Z
dc.date.available2004-05-28T19:28:02Z
dc.date.issued1990-11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/5206
dc.description.abstractAutomatic teller machines and gasoline service stations are two examples of a growing number of "discretionary service facilities." In consuming service from these facilities, a significant fraction of customers do so on an otherwise preplanned trip (e.g., on the daily commute to and from work). A system planner, in determining the best locations of such facilities, is more concerned with placing the facilities along paths of customer flow rather than, say, near the center of a cluster of residences or work places. We formally model this problem and present a method for determining the optimal locations of m discretionary service facilities so as to intercept the maximum possible potential customer flow. We also show how to determine the minimal number of facilities required to intercept a prespecified fraction of total customer flow. Computational results are included.en_US
dc.format.extent1744 bytes
dc.format.extent1478381 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Operations Research Centeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOperations Research Center Working Paper;OR 231-90en_US
dc.titleOptimal Location of Discretionary Service Facilitiesen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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