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dc.contributor.advisorJudith Layzer and John E. Fernandez.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChai, Shutsu K. (Shutsu Kindness)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-maen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-25T15:17:25Z
dc.date.available2010-03-25T15:17:25Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/53225
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 65-68).en_US
dc.description.abstractAs effective imperviousness increases with urbanization, the impacts of stormwater runoff on local water systems and aquatic life are more and more deleterious. Stormwater runoff carries pollutants into nearby water bodies, alters stream banks, reduces stream base flows and bypasses infiltration processes that both clean and recharge groundwater. While these consequences are still invisible to the average citizen, human life is wholly dependent on adequate quantity and quality of water resources, which polluted stormwater runoff threatens. This link has motivated more widespread attention to and effort in stormwater management, yielding new technologies, initiatives and solutions. As this new paradigm for stormwater management grows better established and more broadly accepted, the struggles to minimize the impact of runoff have shifted from the technology to implementation. A deeper understanding of the challenges and barriers to the adoption of new best management practices will allow us to better target efforts to overcome those obstacles. Conducting a case study of Watertown, MA, I interviewed local officials, planners and activists. Through these conversations, I identified four primary barriers: funding shortages, disagreement over implementation mechanisms, knowledge limitations and site constraints. Despite these limitations, educational programs, codified local regulations coupled with design guidelines and a flexible local funding source can help localities surmount those hurdles.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Shutsu K. Chai.en_US
dc.format.extent68 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleManaging stormwater in Watertown, MA : overcoming obstacles to changeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc530218545en_US


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