Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAnantha P. Chandrakasan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Courtney Een_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-25T15:30:46Z
dc.date.available2010-03-25T15:30:46Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/53318
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 83-86).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this research is to reduce static power dissipation by developing a vertically-oriented carbon nanotube-based nanoelectromechanical switch that has no off-state leakage current. This switch, called a nanorelay, is a mechanical switch that uses a carbon nanotube as the active component. The device consists of a line of carbon nanotubes grown on a highly-doped silicon substrate between two contacts that are electrically isolated from the substrate by an insulator. The nanorelay is actuated when a control voltage is applied between the substrate and either one of the contacts. This voltage causes the nanotube to be pulled into and eventually make physical contact with one of the contacts, which allows current to flow through the carbon nanotube. During the off state, a physical gap separates the nanotube from the contact which acts as a near-ideal tunneling barrier to virtually eliminate leakage currents. Since the nanorelay has almost no static power dissipation, it has many potential applications in low-power circuit design. This thesis makes three main contributions. First, a fabrication process to construct nanorelays is presented. Second, potential low-power circuit applications of the nanorelay are explored and implemented in a CMOS test chip. Finally, a test system is developed in order to characterize and quantify the static power savings benefits of using the nanorelay for low-power circuit applications.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Courtney E. Schmitt.en_US
dc.format.extent86 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleCarbon nanotube-based nanorelays for low-power circuit applicationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc550571258en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record