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dc.contributor.advisorYet-Ming Chiang and Andy Chu.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFu, Haitaoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-26T19:17:54Z
dc.date.available2010-04-26T19:17:54Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/54200
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 142-150).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis report, both quantitative and qualitative approaches are used to provide a comprehensive analysis of lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) and battery electric vehicle (BEV) from technological and economical perspectives. Five key factors including power density, energy density, safety, durability, and cost are employed to compare four types of Li-ion batteries. Utility analysis indicates that all the Li-ion batteries are able to satisfy both power density and energy density targets, but only two of them are able to meet safety and durability requirements. Currently, the main challenge for their automotive application is cost reduction, since the cheapest LiFePO₄ battery costs $247.8/kWh which is 1.65 times the cost target established by USABC. Economical values of PHEV and BEV are presented from an end user's point of view. Various sensitivity analysis have been used to identify the impact of key factors such as battery pack cost reduction, driving distance, gasoline price, and government subsidizations on cost effectiveness of PHEV and BEV. Results show that $4,270 and $7,726 of U.S. government subsidizations to an individual user are needed for PHEV and BEV to breakeven. Lastly, the lithium ion battery based electric vehicle systems have also been evaluated in the implementation models in Singapore. The conclusion is that it is not feasible to adopt electric vehicle system in Singapore under current government incentives.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Haitao Fu.en_US
dc.format.extent167 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleImplementations of electric vehicle system based on solar energy in Singapore assessment of lithium ion batteries for automobilesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc566176045en_US


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