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dc.contributor.advisorKent Larson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDimas, Anastasiosen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-26T19:18:07Z
dc.date.available2010-04-26T19:18:07Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/54202
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 158-160).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe nature of work is changing. Until recently, the majority of people worked in fixed, team-based collaborations in collocated settings for fixed periods of time. Currently we are experiencing a major shift towards distributed work. D-work is multi-tasking (workers participate in many projects and teams that often change), multi-locational (work is conducted by people located in different divisions, firms, organizations and time-zones) and mobile (people conduct work while transiting). D-Work changes the definition of the traditional office and blurs the boundaries between home, workplace and the city. Homes will have to accommodate work, businesses must adapt their policies and office spaces to D-work and cities have to adapt to new patterns of mixed work-live units. At the moment, workers, managers and designers have become less aware of where, when, with whom and during which activities, does the most productive and creative work take place. In an effort to tackle the above mentioned issue, we developed a methodology that combines Context-Aware Experience Sampling with traditional ethnographic tools. Our system is composed of a Bluetooth-based positioning system, a context-aware self-report survey administered on mobile phones and traditional questionnaires. The methodology was tested via a four week case study on innovation that was conducted in a marketing firm based in Helsinki. During the study we collected data from eleven participants about the occurrence of work-related ideas and barriers inside and outside the office space.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) All participants provided us with information about their work habits by filling out a questionnaire prior to the beginning of the study. By juxtaposing their answers to their actual work-life data that we collected, similarities and discrepancies between the two emerged that helped us to understand and assess their work behavior. General results as well as personal reports that were compiled for three subjects are presented and analyzed. An overall assessment of the system and suggested improvements based on results and participant feedback are also discussed.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Anastasios Dimas.en_US
dc.format.extent160 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleD-work innovation : where, when and in which social context do good ideas evolve in the distributed work environment of knowledge workers?en_US
dc.title.alternativeWhere, when and in which social context do good ideas evolve in the distributed work environment of knowledge workers?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc567609092en_US


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