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dc.contributor.advisorAngela M. Belcher.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Yun Jung, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-28T17:04:17Z
dc.date.available2010-04-28T17:04:17Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/54578
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 134-139).en_US
dc.description.abstractWithout doubt, energy and environment are becoming central issues for the future. In this regard, not only device performance but also environmentally sustainable ways of making energy device is important. To meet these needs, a M13 virus based biological toolkit was utilized in this work for controlling nanostructures of lithium ion battery electrodes which is a critical process in developing electrodes materials for high power applications. The M13 biological toolkit provides specificity, versatility and multifunctionality for controlling nanostructure of the materials using basic biological principles. The versatile E4 virus template could nucleate active cathode materials at low temperature by an environmentally benign method. High power lithium ion battery cathode materials were fabricated using genetically programmed multifunctional virus as a versatile scaffold for the synthesis and assembly of materials. A novel strategy for specifically attaching electrochemically active materials to conducting carbon nanotubes networks through biological molecular recognition was developed by manipulating the two-genes of the M13 virus. Viral amorphous iron phosphates cathodes achieved remarkable and otherwise impossible high power performance using this multifunctional virus. This environmentally benign low temperature biological scaffold could facilitate new types of electrode materials by activating a class of materials that have been excluded because of their extremely low electronic conductivity. Architecting nanostructures was further extended to activate noble metal alloy nanowires as anodes for lithium ion batteries by alleviating mechanical stress.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) By demonstrating electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Yun Jung Lee.en_US
dc.format.extent[1], 139 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleNanostructured electrodes for lithium ion batteries using biological scaffoldsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc568172156en_US


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