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dc.contributor.advisorWilliam H. Green.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPrakash, Kshitijen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Computation for Design and Optimization Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-25T20:39:09Z
dc.date.available2010-05-25T20:39:09Z
dc.date.copyright2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/55078
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computation for Design and Optimization Program, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 131-137).en_US
dc.description.abstractIGCC with CO2 capture offers an exciting approach for cleanly using abundant coal reserves of the world to generate electricity. The present state-of-the-art synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup technologies in IGCC involve cooling the syngas from gasifier to room temperature or lower for removing Sulfur, Carbon dioxide and Mercury, leading to a large efficiency loss. It is therefore important to develop processes that remove these impurities from syngas at an optimally high temperature in order to maximize the energy efficiency of an IGCC plant. The high temperature advanced syngas cleanup technologies are presently at various stages of development and it is still not clear which technology and configuration of IGCC process would be most energetically efficient. In this thesis, I present a framework to assess the suitability of various candidate syngas cleanup technologies by developing computational simulations of these processes which are used in conjunction with Aspen Plus® to design various IGCC flowsheet configurations. In particular, we evaluate the use of membranes and sorbents for CO2 separation and capture from hot syngas in IGCC, as a substitute to solutionbased absorption processes. We present a multi-stage model for CO2 separation from multi-component gas mixtures using polymeric membranes based on the solutiondiffusion transport mechanism. A numerical simulation of H2 separation from syngas using Pd-alloy based composite metallic membranes is implemented to assess their performance for CO2 sequestration.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) In addition, we develop an equilibrium-based combined pressure and temperature swing adsorption-desorption model to estimate the amount of energy required for capturing pollutants using regenerable sorbent beds. We use our models with Aspen Plus® simulations to identify optimum design and operating conditions for membrane and adsorption processes in an IGCC plant. Furthermore, we identify from our simulations desired thermodynamic properties of sorbents and material properties of membranes that are needed to make these technologies work successfully at IGCC conditions. This should serve to provide an appropriate direction and target for ongoing experimental efforts in developing these novel materials.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Kshitij Prakash.en_US
dc.format.extent137 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectComputation for Design and Optimization Program.en_US
dc.titleSimulation and optimization of hot syngas separation processes in integrated gasification combined cycleen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Computation for Design and Optimization Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Computation for Design and Optimization Program
dc.identifier.oclc587445817en_US


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