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dc.contributor.advisorLaurence R. Young.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaderka, Justin Daviden_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-29T13:51:12Z
dc.date.available2010-10-29T13:51:12Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/59561
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 99-109).en_US
dc.description.abstractHuman physiological systems, especially the cardiovascular and musculo-skeletal systems, are well-known to decondition during spaceflight. Several countermeasures that are in use today have been rigorously developed over the decades to combat this deconditioning. However, these countermeasures are system specific and have proven to be only partially effective. Artificial gravity has been persistently discussed as a countermeasure that potentially has salutary effects on all physiological systems, though few ground-based studies have been performed in comparison to other countermeasures. The current analysis attempts to elucidate the effectiveness of artificial gravity by directly comparing results of previously published and unpublished deconditioning studies with those of more traditional, ground-based countermeasures (i.e. resistive exercise, aerobic exercise, lower body negative pressure, or some variation of these). Animal studies were also evaluated to supplement the knowledge base and to fill gaps in the human countermeasure literature. Designs of published studies, such as study duration, deconditioning paradigm, subject selection criteria, measurements taken, etc., were confounding variables; however, studies that had some measure of consistency between these variables were compared, although notable differences were cited in the analysis and discussion. Results indicate that for prolonged spaceflight an artificial gravity-based countermeasure may provide benefits equivalent to traditional countermeasures for the cardiovascular system. Too few comparable, human studies have been performed to draw any conclusions for the musculo-skeletal system, although animal studies show some positive results. Gaps in the current knowledge of artificial gravity are identified and guidance for future deconditioning studies is offered. Based on the results of this study, a comprehensive artificial gravity protocol is proposed and future research topics using this countermeasure are addressed.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Justin David Kaderka.en_US
dc.format.extent187 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleA critical benefit analysis of artificial gravity as a microgravity countermeasureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc668227169en_US


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