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dc.contributor.advisorJerome J. Connor.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Karen E. (Karen Elizabeth)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-26T14:23:12Z
dc.date.available2011-01-26T14:23:12Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/60780
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 91-93).en_US
dc.description.abstractDesign for Adaptability and Deconstruction (DfAD) is an emerging trend in the construction industry that focuses on the end-of-life aspect of buildings. It is based on the concept that the life of a building or building component ends because it is unable to adapt to change. With proper implementation, DfAD is an important tool to achieve sustainable design for buildings, as it ideally may form a closed materials loop for construction materials by optimizing the amount of materials salvaged at the end of a building's useful life through deconstruction. This thesis focuses on ways to improve the feasibility of deconstruction and material savings, primarily through DfAD. By implementing DfAD principles and guidelines, designing with reusable materials, and planning and implementing a project effectively, the current practical and economic barriers to deconstruction may be mitigated. This thesis presents the essential considerations for deconstruction and materials salvage and presents potential policies to improve its viability. Three case studies present the applications of DfAD approaches and the lessons learned from common challenges associated with deconstruction.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Karen E. Quinn.en_US
dc.format.extent93 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleImproving the feasibility of building deconstruction and adaptabilityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693952408en_US


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