Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMartin F. Polz and Roman Stocker.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVahora, Nishaen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-26T14:24:16Z
dc.date.available2011-01-26T14:24:16Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/60787
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 47-51).en_US
dc.description.abstractTraditional views of marine environments describe the ocean pelagic zone as a homogeneous nutrient-poor environment. Heterotrophic marine bacteria that have evolved high-energy mechanisms for swimming abilities and sensing nutrient gradients would gain no survival advantage under this model. Recent identification of microscale (<1cm) nutrient patches, such as those produced by algal exudates, explain a potential for these evolved functions. With this new model for the pelagic zone, bacteria, through chemotaxis and motility, can sense and respond to microscale carbon patches exuded from growing algae. This study examines possible conditions necessary under which it is advantageous to swim. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we developed a system to investigate bacterial chemotaxis to algal exudates. Two algae from the genus, Thalassiosira, which differed in size, were grown in artificial seawater and filtered, with the use of a novel instrument, to generate nutrient heterogeneity at the microscale. Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis was added to algal cultures with varying algae:bacteria ratios of 1:250 to 1:50,000 and bacterial chemotaxis was observed by localization around individual algae. P. haloplanktis exhibited chemotaxis towards the larger algae Thalassiosira rotula within seconds but not Thalassiosira weissflogii suggesting larger algae elicit a chemotactic response. Results provide evidence of real time clustering in response to the presence of live algae and suggest a mechanism that provides a fitness advantage over non-motile bacteria.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Nisha Vahora.en_US
dc.format.extent51 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleMicro-scale interactions between chemotactic bacteria and algaeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc695400141en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record