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dc.contributor.authorMumma, Gordonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmoliar, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-10-04T14:44:37Z
dc.date.available2004-10-04T14:44:37Z
dc.date.issued1971-02-01en_US
dc.identifier.otherAIM-213en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/6187
dc.description.abstractThis memo was originally presented as a Project MAC seminar on February 20, 1970. From the outset, the computer has established two potential roles in the musical arts--the one as a sound synthesizer and the other as a composer (or composer's assistant). The most important developments in synthesis have been due to MAX Matthew at the Bell telephone Laboratories [7]. His music V system endows a computer with most of the capabilities of the standard hardware of electronic music. Its primary advantage is that the user may specify arbitrarily complex sound sequences and achieve then with a minimum of editing effort. Its primary disadvantage is that it is not on-line, so that the user loses that critical sense of immediacy which he, as a composer, may deem valuable.en_US
dc.format.extent4502159 bytes
dc.format.extent373376 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/postscript
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAIM-213en_US
dc.titleThe Computer as a Performing Instrumenten_US


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