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dc.contributor.advisorMartin L. Culpepper.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Jonathan B. (Jonathan Brigham)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-25T16:11:14Z
dc.date.available2011-04-25T16:11:14Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62511
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 191-195).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this thesis is to generate the knowledge required to (i) synthesize serial flexure systems and (ii) optimally place actuators using a comprehensive library of geometric shapes called freedom, actuation, and constraint spaces. These geometric shapes guide designers through the creative process of concept generation without compromising engineering rigor. Each shape rapidly conveys the mathematics of screw theory, projective geometry, and constraint-based design by visually depicting regions where constraints and actuators may be placed for synthesizing optimal flexure concepts. In this way, designers may consider every flexure concept that satisfies the desired functional requirements before selecting the final design. FACT was created to improve the design processes for small-scale flexure systems and precision machines. For instance, there is a need to create multi-axis nanopositioners for emerging three-dimensional nano-scale research/manufacturing. Through this work the following contributions were made: (1) the fifty freedom and constraint space types were found that may be used to synthesize both parallel and serial flexure concepts, (2) intermediate freedom spaces were created that help designers stack conjugated flexure elements to avoid or utilize underconstraint, (3) a twist-wrench stiffness matrix was created to model the elastomechanic behavior of flexure systems, (4) the twenty-six actuation spaces were found that help guide designers in placing actuators that minimize motion errors, and (5) a theory was created that determines the force and displacement actuator outputs for accessing a desired DOF once actuators have been placed. A serially conjugated lead screw flexure was designed using the FACT design process and a parallel flexure system was built to validate the theory of actuation described in this thesis.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jonathan Brigham Hopkins.en_US
dc.format.extent195 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleDesign of flexure-based motion stages for mechatronic systems via Freedom, Actuation and Constraint Topologies (FACT)en_US
dc.title.alternativeDesign of flexure-based motion stages for mechatronic systems via FACTen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712602238en_US


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