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dc.contributor.advisorDonald R Sadoway.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFernandez, Ted (Ted A.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-09T15:18:14Z
dc.date.available2011-05-09T15:18:14Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62676
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 109-110).en_US
dc.description.abstractEnergy storage can provide many benefits to the electric grid of the United States of America. With recent pushes to stabilize renewable energy and implement a Smart Grid, battery technology can play a pivotal role in the advancement of energy storage of the grid. While there are many types of batteries that have been brought to market in recent years, four commonly mentioned practical systems are sodium sulfur, flow batteries, long life lead acid, and lithium ion batteries. A new type of battery, the "liquid metal battery" boasts low cost and easy maintenance while also providing superior power and capacity. However, this technology is still in its developmental stage. This study implements a framework for analyzing these five technologies for implementation in real-life scenarios. Firstly, a technological comparison of battery types and application requirements is conducted in order to see which technology is best suited for different applications. Next, an in depth cost analysis is done for each technology, so they can be compared on a total cost of ownership (#/kWh cycled) basis. Lastly, each technology is evaluated for each application through a financial analysis. This analysis encompasses current estimates on market valuation and provides net present values of investments for each battery type and application.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ted Fernandez.en_US
dc.format.extent135 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleTechnological and economic comparison of battery technologies for U.S.A electric grid stabilization applicationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc714258000en_US


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