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dc.contributor.advisorDonald R. Sadoway.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBradwell, David (David Johnathon)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-09T15:28:32Z
dc.date.available2011-05-09T15:28:32Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62741
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 198-206).en_US
dc.description.abstractThree novel forms of liquid metal batteries were conceived, studied, and operated, and their suitability for grid-scale energy storage applications was evaluated. A ZnlITe ambipolar electrolysis cell comprising ZnTe dissolved in molten ZnCl 2 at 500 0C was first investigated by two- and three-electrode electrochemical analysis techniques. The electrochemical behavior of the melt, thermodynamic properties, and kinetic properties were evaluated. A single cell battery was constructed, demonstrating for the first time the simultaneous extraction of two different liquid metals onto electrodes of opposite polarity. Although a low open circuit voltage and high material costs make this approach unsuitable for the intended application, it was found that this electrochemical phenomenon could be utilized in a new recycling process for bimetallic semiconductors. A second type of liquid metal battery was investigated that utilized the potential difference generated by metal alloys of different compositions. MgjlSb cells of this nature were operated at 700 °C, demonstrating that liquid Sb can serve as a positive electrode. Ca,MgIIBi cells also of this nature were studied and a Ca,Mg liquid alloy was successfully used as the negative electrode, permitting the use of Ca as the electroactive species. Thermodynamic and battery performance results suggest that Ca,MgIISb cells have the potential to achieve a sufficient cell voltage, utilize earth abundant materials, and meet the demanding cost and cycle-life requirements for use in grid-scale energy storage applications.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby David J. Bradwell.en_US
dc.format.extent206 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleLiquid metal batteries : ambipolar electrolysis and alkaline earth electroalloying cellsen_US
dc.title.alternativeAmbipolar electrolysis and alkaline earth electroalloying cellsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc717486146en_US


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