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dc.contributor.advisorLawrence Sass.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhisby, Afiya Aen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-23T17:56:10Z
dc.date.available2011-05-23T17:56:10Z
dc.date.copyright2004en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62978
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B. in Architectural Design)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, February 2005.en_US
dc.description"December 2004." Cataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractNo discussion on architecture and race would be complete without a look at the slave fortresses of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. The importation of African slaves to the Americas was the economic catalyst that subsequently catapulted America in a world superpower, and questionably into imperial leadership. Speckled along the coast of West Africa, the architecture of the slave trade is as monumental and systematically oppressive as the institution it sustained. Due to the rise in prison privatization and the common practice of leasing prison labor to corporations while paying the offenders a menial fee, the American prison industry is operating more and more like slave fortresses. Spatially, the spaces are particularly similar in the areas of exterior formal qualities and parallel evolution of urban planning.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Afiya A. Whisby.en_US
dc.format.extent22 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleArchitecture of oppression : slave fortresses and their relevance to contemporary American urban prison architectureen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.in Architectural Designen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720329730en_US


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