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dc.contributor.advisorYet-Ming Chiang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChin, Timothy Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-23T18:02:27Z
dc.date.available2011-05-23T18:02:27Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/63015
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractElectrode materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries are well-known to undergo significant dimensional changes during lithium-ion insertion and extraction. In the battery community, this has often been looked upon negatively as a degradation mechanism. However, the crystallographic strains are large enough to warrant investigation for use as actuators. Lithium battery electrode materials lend themselves to two separate types of actuators. On one hand, intercalation oxides and graphite provide moderate strains, on the order of a few percent, with moderate bandwidth (frequency). Lithium intercalation of graphite can achieve actuation energy densities of 6700 kJ m-3 with strains up to 6.7%. Intercalation oxides provide strains on the order of a couple percent, but allow for increased bandwidth. Using a conventional stacked electrode design, a cell consisting of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) and carbon achieved 1.2% strain with a mechanical power output of 1000 W m 3 . Metals, on the other hand, provide colossal strains (hundreds of percent) upon lithium alloying, but do not cycle well. Instead, a self-amplifying device was designed to provide continuous, prolonged, one-way actuation over longer time scales. This was still able to achieve an energy density of 1700 kJ n 3, significantly greater than other actuation technologies such as shape-memory alloys and conducting polymers, with displacements approaching 10 mm from a 1 mm thick disc. Further, by using lithium metal as the counterelectrode in an electrochemical couple, these actuation devices can be selfpowered: mechanical energy and electrical energy can be extracted simultaneously.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Timothy Edward Chin.en_US
dc.format.extent153 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleElectrochemical to mechanical energy conversionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720919705en_US


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