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dc.contributor.advisorRandall Davis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChao, Chih-yu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-23T18:12:02Z
dc.date.available2011-05-23T18:12:02Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/63066
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 109-114).en_US
dc.description.abstractMobile devices nowadays contain state-of-the-art technologies and are considered "smart". However, we and others around us are often interrupted or embarrassed by these smart devices because the calls and messages received by the devices are not always presented to us at the right moment with the appropriate modality. Our work investigates what information a device like this needs to know, and how the device should make use of such information in order to behave "politely". We began by investigating the human definition of "politeness" in the context of handling voice calls and text messages, and we found the common properties shared by the scenarios where a device is expected to behave politely. Next, we built a rulebased decision-making system that infers user interruptability and decides when and how the device should interrupt the user. We then determined whether the vocabulary defined in our rule set has captured general users' definition of a polite device. We also determined that users were able to understand the system's vocabulary and customize the rule set for their own needs. To further accommodate individual users' needs, we created a debugging interface that allows users to explore the rule set and modify the rules when the device "misbehaves". After that, we identified two major challenges in debugging: user's willingness to debug, displaying the structure of the rule set on a small screen real estate. Lastly, we pointed out the aspects that can be investigated in the future to improve our current work, including: augmenting the vocabulary when more signals become available, considering users of different use habits and cultural backgrounds, and designing a better interface that addresses the challenges in debugging.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Chih-yu Chao.en_US
dc.format.extent114 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleWhy can't smart phones be polite, too? : what would a phone need to know?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc725617609en_US


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