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dc.contributor.advisorWilliam J. Mitchell.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrick, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-18T14:01:17Z
dc.date.available2011-07-18T14:01:17Z
dc.date.copyright1997en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/64899
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1997.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaf 36).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe information age has provided exciting challenges for designers and users to interact and work in virtual environments. This has resulted in new interpretations to the representation of places as they begin to develop, interact and communicate their ideas in this medium. Can designers shape the many sites that are beginning to form and can the sites serve as places for interaction/communication linked only through this virtual world? How can designers react to such a landscape? Can we begin to create this environment so that an effective communication between the environment and user can take place How should this environment be represented to the user? Finally, can we begin to "experience" the virtual artifact in a way that is flexible enough in its representation to allow for simultaneous communication of the physical space and the perceptual representation of that place. These will be some of the main issues addressed in the thesis. My investigation seeks to develop a virtual interface for communication of an architectural artifact, that designers can use as a representation to assist them in contextualizing their understanding of that place and to facilitate an environment that aids in communicating within a virtual setting? The artifact created are the virtual design spaces here at MIT and the site for the project will be the World Wide Web. The thesis addresses three main issues. The first will discuss navigating through the artifact. The second issue will endeavor to coalesce the fragmented views of representation though a simulation. The third will explore supplementing current representations into a experiential model to better understand the spaces and the ideas that generated them.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityDaniel J. Brick.en_US
dc.format.extent36 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.titleDigital domains : the understanding and making of a "place" in cyberspaceen_US
dc.title.alternativeUnderstanding and making of a "place" in cyberspaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc37554194en_US


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