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dc.contributor.advisorJames I. Hileman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPearlson, Matthew Noahen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-30T15:43:52Z
dc.date.available2011-08-30T15:43:52Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/65508
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M. in Technology and Policy)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 99-106).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents a model to quantify the economic costs and environmental impacts of producing fuels from hydroprocessed renewable oils (HRO) process. Aspen Plus was used to model bio-refinery operations and supporting utilities. Material and energy balances for electricity, carbon dioxide, and water requirements as well as economic costs were obtained from these models. A discounted-cash-flow-rate-of-return (DCFROR) economic model was used to evaluate minimum product values for diesel and jet fuels under various economic conditions. The baseline gate cost for distillate fuel production were found to range between $3.80 and $4.38 per gallon depending on the size of the facility. The additional cost for maximizing jet fuel production ranged between $0.25 and $0.30 per gallon. While the cost of feedstock is the most significant portion of fuel cost, facility size, financing, and capacity utilization were found to be sensitive parameters of the gate cost. The total water use of the system was found to be 0.9 pounds of water per pound of vegetable oil processed. Lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) for the processing step were found to range between 10.1 and 13.0 gCO 2e per MJ of distillate fuel using an energy allocation method consistent with methods in the literature. Finally, the policy landscape for producing jet and diesel fuels from renewable oils was reviewed from the perspective of a fuel producer. It was found that the potential of HRO fuels penetrating the market is dependent on the availability of feedstocks and access to capital.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Matthew Noah Pearlson.en_US
dc.format.extent106 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.titleA techno-economic and environmental assessment of hydroprocessed renewable distillate fuelsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc746766700en_US


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