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dc.contributor.advisorJulie Dorsey.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFeldgoise, Jeffreyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T18:28:42Z
dc.date.available2011-09-27T18:28:42Z
dc.date.copyright1997en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/65983
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Arch.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1997.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 89-90).en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the primary roles of architecture is to control the environment at the service of a building's inhabitants. Thermal qualities are a significant factor in the overall experience one has inside and outside a building. However, thermal issues are not often considered within the context of the architectural design process, resulting in buildings that are not responsive to thermal concerns. Heat has the potential to influence the form of architectural space. The methods by which architects can use thermal energy as a formative element in design is open to further exploration. In this thesis, I explore new methods for architects to describe thermal intentions and visualize thermal qualities of design proposals. Beyond the economic issue of energy conservation, the thermal qualities of building spaces affect the quality of human inhabitation. The capability to describe and visualize heat would allow architects to adjust the building's thermal characteristics to modify a person's experience of the place. With a more complete understanding of thermal qualities of their building proposals, architects would be able to design for the complete gamut of thermal sensations that humans can experience. What is needed is a working vocabulary that describes the range of thermal conditions possible in buildings. In this work, I describe a vocabulary for a building's thermal qualities using four sets of measurable, opposing terms: open versus protected, bright versus dim, warm versus cool, and active versus still. Next, I then articulate the thermal qualities of a co-housing project to create a thermal experience that enhances the community aspects of co-housing. Using a variety of visualization techniques, I verify that the design proposal is achieving the intended thermal goals. Using the knowledge gained from this and future thermal design exercises, we can begin to reflect on the general relationships between thermal phenomena and physical building forms, learning about the thermal qualities of architecture.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJeffrey Feldgoise.en_US
dc.format.extent90 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.titleThermal design through space and timeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc36892270en_US


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