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dc.contributor.advisorAnn Pendleton-Jullian.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHamid, Afshanen_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-maen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-01T19:43:20Z
dc.date.available2011-11-01T19:43:20Z
dc.date.copyright1997en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/66776
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Arch.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1997.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 48-49).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe condition of being migrant is peculiar to modernity. Being migrant is often a result of political estrangement from one's homeland, or dislocation due to economic pressures. It is a status which requires the individual to be temporary, shifting and dynamic. If the position becomes static, the migrant becomes an immigrant alien in a new and unfamiliar geographical location. Thus immigrant is the radical instability of the modern experience. Immigrant is not only a consequence of modernity, but also a metaphor for the process of modernity. Being migrant has the trauma of dislocation, of relearning communication, rethinking a cultural dialogue. It is also an interiorized alone sense of loneliness, and even a longing for a return to a familiar place and time. Being immigrant is a journey, both mental and physical. This thesis concerns itself with the issues of being an immigrant. In particular, the debate will revolve around immigrants of the last twenty years, the Asian community. I am interested in this group because they are still struggling to assimilate themselves into the American experience. The town of Lowell, Massachusetts has a community of recent immigrants from Vietnam, Cambodia and Korea. These people have been encouraged to resettle their lives due to government programs and a strong manufacturing industry in Lowell. They inhabit a part of Lowell known as Acre and the Lowlands. These areas have been home to the first Irish settlers in Lowell in the 1850s. The site for the project is itself a borderland condition, precisely where the existing Lowell community stops development and the immigrants begin their settlement. The area is currently a residential fabric on one side and an industrial locality on the opposite. The Pawtucket Canal, a man-made canal, runs through the site, acting both as a boundary and a seam.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Afshan Hamid.en_US
dc.format.extent49 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.titleDiaspora, dislocation, denizen : a cultural center in Lowell, Massachusettsen_US
dc.title.alternativeCultural center in Lowell, Massachusettsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architectureen_US
dc.identifier.oclc37554038en_US


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