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dc.contributor.advisorJames M. Buckley.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Julie, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-01T19:56:53Z
dc.date.available2011-11-01T19:56:53Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/66880
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 186-194).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the past few decades, arts organizations have played an increasingly significant role in the development of vibrant spaces that improve the livelihoods of people and transform the quality of the urban environment. Innovative art spaces - ones that devise new methods of approaching the creation of space using familiar elements - are gaining attention because of their ability to navigate the challenges of developing affordable and usable art space. These new models of art space, whether they are repurposed storefronts or sustainable buildings, have far-reaching effects on the physical, social, and economic fabric of their surrounding communities. This thesis examines four innovative art spaces in New York City, Boston, and the greater Los Angeles area. Each case study features unique approaches to space, programming, community engagement, cross-sector partnerships, funding, and sustainability. My focus is on the following questions: (1) What are the factors that make an art space innovative and transformative? (2) What are the successes and challenges in the development of these art spaces? (3) How can cities cultivate these types of art spaces? Through site visits, interviews with organizational leaders, funders, and other stakeholders, and research with secondary sources, I explore these questions and identify major themes that add to our understanding of how successful and innovative art spaces are conceived. This thesis offers recommendations for city planners, policymakers, arts organizations, and artist entrepreneurs on how to approach the development of art space, including adapting successful elements of these models in their own contexts.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Julie Chan.en_US
dc.format.extent194 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleBeyond the white box : creating innovative art spaces that transform people and placesen_US
dc.title.alternativeCreating innovative art spaces that transform people and placesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc758243296en_US


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