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dc.contributor.advisorRicardo Valerdi.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Dennis C. (Dennis Christopher)en_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-09T21:22:32Z
dc.date.available2011-12-09T21:22:32Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/67551
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M. in Engineering and Management)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, System Design and Management Program, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 117-118).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe U. S. federal government contracts over five hundred billion dollars in goods and services each year. Traditionally, these contracts are awarded on the basis of a combination of a contractor's proposed cost, quality, technical capability and demonstrated past performance. While all valid and important comparators, the overall quality and customer satisfaction achieved at the completion of contracts awarded on these bases remains highly variable from contract-to-contract. This thesis examines potential reasons for the variability of these results and further proposes additional factors for contract evaluation and award that should improve the chances for successful contract outcomes. Twenty four randomly selected and recently completed U. S. Coast Guard construction contracts were used as the basis for study. The documented performance information for each contract was compared against contract demographic information in a search for correlations that are predictive of the likelihood of a high level of contract satisfaction. Contract performance ratings, contract timeliness and contract on-budget performance were compared to overall contractor annual revenue, total contractor employees, the relative contract size and a contractor's revenue per employee. The main finding is that total contractor revenue, relative contract size (higher is better) and contractor revenue per employee (higher is better) are reliable predictors of performance and should be considered as relevant source selection factors for negotiated contracts. Capable small contractors should be selected not simply as a matter of conformance to a social program, but because the expected results are higher. In addition, the following recommendations apply in order to maximize the probability of positive performance outcomes on U. S. Coast Guard construction contracts: 1) Improve the collection and utilization of past performance data. 2) Minimize sealed-low bid contracting. 3) Maximize contracts by negotiation. 4) Maximize the usage of small businesses, above the "micro-small" level.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Dennis C. Evans.en_US
dc.format.extent122 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titlePredictors of successful outcomes of U.S. Coast Guard construction contractsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Engineering and Managementen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc761391095en_US


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