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dc.contributor.advisorBrian D. Snyder.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuckland, Daniel Milleren_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-12T19:24:31Z
dc.date.available2012-01-12T19:24:31Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/68402
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. Vita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 52-55).en_US
dc.description.abstractNeck and back pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints in personnel in variable acceleration environments such as astronauts and military pilots. Ultrasound is known for dynamic imaging and diagnostic workup of the axial and appendicular skeleton, but is not currently used to image the cervical spine, the injury of which may change the biomechanics of the cervical vertebrae, which CT and MRI (the current gold standard in cervical spine imaging) are poor at capturing. To validate ultrasound as a modality for imaging dynamic motion of the cervical spine several experiments were performed in static and dynamic human and animal (ovine) models: 1. Static analysis of ex-vivo ovine cervical spines imaged by ultrasound, MRI, and CT demonstrated that the imaging modality affected the measured intervertebral disc height (p<0.01); similar evaluation was done in-vivo in Emergency Department patients who received a CT scan as part of their clinical course that showed that ultrasound could fit into existing clinical workflows. 2. Dynamic analysis of isolated ex-vivo ovine cervical spinal segments intervertebral disc displacement with a mounted ultrasound probe demonstrated a measurement uncertainty of ± 0.2 mm and no bias at low frequency sinusoidal spinal displacement. A similar evaluation in-vivo with humans with an ultrasound probe mounted on a cervical-collar found a 0.8-1.3 mm amount of cervical spine distraction from the C4-5 Functional Spinal Unit. In human cadavers subjected to passive flexion and extension of the cervical spine, ultrasound measurements of the relative flexion/extension angles between consecutive cervical vertebrae were similar to fluoroscopy. 3. Ultrasound was able to record dynamic motion of the cervical spine in-vivo in running on a treadmill, during parabolic flight, and traveling over a rough road in a military vehicle. The ultrasound methods developed and tested in this thesis could provide an inexpensive, portable and safe technique that can identify and characterize cervical spine anatomy and pathology.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Acknowledgment: National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Army Research Office, Children's Hospital Orthopedic Surgery Foundationen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Daniel Miller Buckland.en_US
dc.format.extent60 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleUltrasound imaging of cervical spine motion for extreme acceleration environmentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc768421201en_US


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