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dc.contributor.advisorMaria C. Yang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHernley, Lauren R. (Lauren Renee)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-30T16:54:22Z
dc.date.available2012-01-30T16:54:22Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/68841
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, June 2011.en_US
dc.description"June 2011." Cataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 25).en_US
dc.description.abstractIdentifying the purpose of a prototype is central to making informed decisions about the kind of prototype to build. Houde and Hill (1997) propose a model for classifying prototypes according to their purpose and the design questions they answer. Since this model was created for user interaction design, it has never been applied to physical prototypes on a large scale or to a progression of prototypes through the product development cycle. Ten physical prototypes from an MIT mechanical engineering senior capstone design course are evaluated according to the Houde and Hill (1997) model. With only a few challenges, the model is found to be applicable to physical prototypes, providing insight into the nature of physical prototyping, the product development cycle, and MIT's senior design course. In the process, a notional relationship between the progression of the product development cycle and the number of design questions answered is proposed.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Lauren R. Hernley.en_US
dc.format.extent29 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleAn analysis of early stage prototypes using implementation, look and feel, and roleen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc772609684en_US


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