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dc.contributor.advisorJohn de Monchaux.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Alexis (Alexis Abreu)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-nyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T17:56:46Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T17:56:46Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/69457
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 50-51).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2009 the New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT) initiated a Pilot Streets Program that called for the temporary closure of Broadway between 47th and 42nd Streets to all vehicular traffic. With Times Square and the Green Light for Midtown project as a central case study, this thesis explores the methods behind the temporary project approach. How does this approach differ from more conventional planning methods? What performance indicators are used to evaluate project results and impacts? What quantitative and qualitative factors influence the decision to make the provisional project permanent? Can this strategy serve as an alternative approach to the more conventional and longer duration implementation methods practiced widely across the US? Can it build public support for such initiatives? The Green Light in Midtown project was implemented in a very short time period, at low cost, based on an explicit commitment of government to assess the performance of the project over an eight-month period in relation to a set of measurable criteria. Measurements showed that diverted traffic moved more quickly, injuries to motorists and pedestrians declined, and pedestrian activity increased, while more qualitative assessments were difficult to achieve. This innovative project approach shows signs of success in making large-scale policies and programs tangible to residents, workers, stakeholders and visitors.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alexis Taylor.en_US
dc.format.extent51 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleLawn chairs in Times Square : an analysis of the Pilot Streets Program and the provisional project approach for New York City's Green Light in Midtown projecten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc774914771en_US


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