Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBrent D. Ryan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMolina Costa, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-maen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T17:57:17Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T17:57:17Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/69464
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 93-99).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the challenges and opportunities of the community-based redevelopment model in a neoliberal economic context. Drawing on a review of the history and theories of redevelopment and governance in the United States, it analyzes the particular case of Jackson Square, a community-led redevelopment process in a low-income neighborhood between Roxbury and Jamaica Plain, in Boston. In an area that was razed for the construction of a failed highway project in the late 1960s, a partnership of community development corporations (CDCs) and private developers are struggling to implement a plan that was defined through a public participation process. The Jackson Square case is a paradigmatic example of a highly democratic decision-making process that resulted in a community vision for a distressed area. However, despite ideal community engagement and development by community-based nonprofit organizations, the project is being seriously delayed and downgraded due to an economic recession, while the community is not mobilizing to defend their vision and ask for much-needed public support. Given the structural inequalities engendered by the neoliberal economic system, and the government's retreat from leading the revitalization of distressed neighborhoods, this research questions the present ability of community-led processes to achieve their goals. Through a critical analysis of the role that each group involved is playing, this thesis aims to contribute to the improvement of the community-led redevelopment model in a way that enhances the creation of a more just city.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Patricia Molina Costa.en_US
dc.format.extent101 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleWhose city? : redevelopment and governance in Bostonen_US
dc.title.alternativeRedevelopment and governance in Boston.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc775014519en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record