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dc.contributor.advisorPattie Maes.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLinder, Natanen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-16T16:04:31Z
dc.date.available2012-03-16T16:04:31Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/69803
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 143-150).en_US
dc.description.abstractFor quite some time, researchers and designers in the field of human computer interaction have strived to better integrate information interfaces into our physical environment. They envisioned a future where computing and interface components would be integrated into the physical environment, creating a seamless experience that uses all our senses. One possible approach to this problem employs projected augmented reality. Such systems project digital information and interfaces onto the physical world and are typically implemented using interactive projector-camera systems. This thesis work is centered on design and implementation of a new form factor for computing, a system we call LuminAR. LuminAR is a compact and kinetic projected augmented reality interface embodied in familiar everyday objects, namely a light bulb and a task light. It allows users to dynamically augment physical surfaces and objects with superimposed digital information using gestural and multi-touch interfaces. This thesis documents LuminAR's design process, hardware and software implementation and interaction techniques. The work is motivated through a set of applications that explore scenarios for interactive and kinetic projected augmented reality interfaces. It also opens the door for further explorations of kinetic interaction and promotes the adoption of projected augmented reality as a commonplace user interface modality. This thesis work was partially supported by a research grant from Intel Corporation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by a research grant from Intel Corporationen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Natan Linder.en_US
dc.format.extent150 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.titleLuminAR : a compact and kinetic projected augmented reality interfaceen_US
dc.title.alternativeCompact and kinetic projected augmented reality interfaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
dc.identifier.oclc777961870en_US


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