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dc.contributor.advisorMaurice Smith.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrandt, James Mossen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-maen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-02T15:22:53Z
dc.date.available2012-07-02T15:22:53Z
dc.date.copyright1986en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/71376
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Arch.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1986.en_US
dc.descriptionMICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND ROTCHen_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 111-113).en_US
dc.description.abstractI propose to design a place of study and worship for the Newton Minyan, a Jewish community fellowship based in Newton, Massachusetts. While the project's programmatic design considerations and adopted iconography will certainly reflect an inherited tradition, the specific needs, worship styles, and continued interpretation of a tradition make necessary a development of a new archetype. This archetype will be developed by interpreting the needs of the community, and by rediscovering applications of a Hebreic concept of building. Thesis research focuses on a Hebreic concept of form as an architecture acknowledging time. One that composes and retains cultural meaning by integrating space and time; one that recognizes the cycles of nature and generations. Biblical models are interpreted to rediscover a tradition of Jewish place making and the discoveries are interpreted into a client generated program of use. The thesis uses the design process to develop the relationship between architect and builder by employing an adaptive foundation system and modular structural and enclosure systems that encourage on- site and post- occupancy design changes. It aims for a building that speaks about how it is made, following the Hebrew view that materials are hallowed by their use and must be employed with honesty and integrity -- according to their nature. It aims for a building that tells the story of its creation, a product that avoids the master plan and extends the process. It looks to expand, and improve, the architect- builder relationship by inviting the user into the place-making process. These aspects are brought together to examine how the built environment -- and the process of building it -- can sponsor cultural growth and ground our shared meanings in the past-future. The thesis looks to improve the process of building, and to explore the meaning found in it.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby James Moss Brandt.en_US
dc.format.extent125 p. (some folded)en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleA Hebreic concept of form : a tabernacle for the Newton Center Shabbat Minyanen_US
dc.title.alternativeTabernacle for the Newton Center Shabbat Minyanen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc15434938en_US


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