Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRobert T. Morris.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSubramanian, Jayashree, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-02T15:47:30Z
dc.date.available2012-07-02T15:47:30Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/71490
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 113-116).en_US
dc.description.abstractFlooding in wireless mesh networks involves distributing some data from one node to rest of the nodes in the network. This dissertation proposes UFlood, a flooding protocol for wireless mesh networks that targets large file transfers, such as software updates, where achieving high throughput (minimizing the time to complete the flood to all nodes) and low airtime (lower the time each node spends in transmitting packets, and thus lower the impact on other wireless traffic) are both important. The central challenge in good flooding performance is the choice of senders for each transmission opportunity. At each time during a flood, some parts of the network will have received more data than others. The set of best sending nodes lies along the boundaries between these regions, and evolves with time in ways that are difficult to predict. UFlood's key new idea is a distributed heuristic to dynamically choose the senders likely to lead to all nodes receiving the flooded data in the least time. The mechanism takes into account which data nearby receivers already have as well as inter-node channel quality. The mechanism includes a novel bit-rate selection algorithm that trades off the speed of high bit-rates against the larger number of nodes likely to receive low bit-rates. Unusually, UFlood uses both random network coding to increase the usefulness of each transmission and detailed feedback about what data each receiver already has; the feedback is critical in deciding which node's coded transmission will have the most benefit to receivers. The required feedback is potentially voluminous, but UFlood includes novel techniques to reduce its cost. The dissertation concludes that careful choice of senders allows UFlood to achieve 150% higher throughput than MORE, a known high-throughput flooding protocol, using 65% less time transmitting. UFlood uses 54% lower airtime than MNP, an existing flooding protocol to minimize airtime, and achieves 300% higher throughput.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jayashree Subramanian.en_US
dc.format.extent116 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleEfficient flooding for wireless mesh networksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc795580425en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record