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dc.contributor.advisorDonald Rosenfield and Chris Caplice.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRiechel, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-27T15:28:53Z
dc.date.available2012-09-27T15:28:53Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/73394
dc.descriptionThesis (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division; in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 59-60).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses the question of how to optimize a distribution network when the supply chain has undergone an incremental change. A case study is presented for Company A, a major global biotechnology company that recently acquired a new manufacturing facility in Ireland. Company A already has international operations throughout Europe and the rest of the world through its network of 3rd party logistics providers, wholesalers, and distributors, as well as its own Benelux-based international distribution center. It now seeks to optimize its current network by taking into consideration the possibility of distributing product directly out of Ireland and by potentially outsourcing some of the distribution currently sourced from its Benelux facility. The thesis uses a phased approach to optimizing the network in order to tackle the common enterprise challenges of 1) building consensus around the solution and 2) simultaneously learning about the problem while attempting to solve it in order to meet a compressed project schedule. Through a number of simplifications, the thesis reduces the problem scope to a level that both enables the use of this phased approach and provides for a less-complex and less time-intense analysis manageable within the given time frame. The unique characteristics of the biotechnology industry drive the analysis to closely study direct effects of and potential risks to availability and lead-time of the various distribution options while trading off distribution, packaging, inventory, and capital expenditure costs. The recommendations resulting from the analysis described in this thesis are used to inform Company A's future distribution strategy regarding additional warehousing capacities, the continued use of the Benelux facility, as well as potential strategic partnerships with 3rd party logistics service providers.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Patrick Riechel.en_US
dc.format.extent60 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.titleA phased approach to distribution network optimization given incremental supply chain changeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc810126866en_US


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