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dc.contributor.advisorAnne Middleton Wagner.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreeley, Robin Adèleen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T18:01:12Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T18:01:12Z
dc.date.copyright1988en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74338
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1988.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 66-73).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1935, Andre Breton published his speech Qu'est-ce que le Surrealisme? with Rene Magritte's drawing, "Le Viol" (The Rape) on its cover. The image, a view of a woman's head in which her facial features have been replaced by her torso, was meant to shock the viewer out of complacent acceptance of present reality into "surreality," that liberated state of being which would foster revolutionary social change. Because "Le Viol" is such a violently charged image and because of the claims made for it by Magritte for its revolutionary potential, the drawing has been the subject of many arguments, both for and against its effectiveness. The feminist community has had a particular interest in this image (and in Magritte's work as a whole) not only because of the controversial treatment of the female subject in "Le Viol," but also because of the ways in which our culture has been so easily able to strip surrealist images of their political content and subsume them back into mainstream culture for use in those very categories of social practice which Surrealism wanted to eradicate. The reincorporation of surrealist works has been especially noticeable and damaging in the case of images of women, as feminists like Susan Gubar and Mary Ann Caws have pointed out Against those claims made against "Le Viol" as an image which affirms phallocentric language and discourse rather than disrupting them, I argue in this paper that the drawing in fact exposes the mechanisms by which female sexuality is formed and controlled within phallocentric language. In exposing these constructions, "Le Viol" forces the viewer to realize them as ideological positions which maintain women as Other, as unable to gain access to coherent meaning within that language. In performing this function, Magritte's picture undermines that process through which women are deprived of a coherent self-image and of the material power which comes with that image in the social realm. To substantiate my arguments, I trace the relationship between several of Magritte's images and the surrealist texts in which they were published, in order to provide a complex understanding of the interrelationships between word and image to which the artist directed much of his work. My use of the theoretical positions of deconstruction, feminism and psychoanalysis allows me to take the observations made onto the terrain of sexuality. These positions provide an understanding of how language and representation operate with respect to each other, and how the human subject (particularly the female) is formed through language.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Robin Adèle Greeley.en_US
dc.format.extent93 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSurrealism (Literature)en_US
dc.titleImage, text and the female body : René Magritte and the surrealist publicationsen_US
dc.title.alternativeRené Magritte and the surrealist publicationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18809279en_US


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