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dc.contributor.advisorTunney Lee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGlenn, Daniel Jen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T18:01:57Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T18:01:57Z
dc.date.copyright1989en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74348
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1989.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 141-145).en_US
dc.description.abstractPre-planned, centrally-managed, privatized public space is rapidly replacing the traditional downtowns of our communities and increasingly, the centers of our largest cities--in the form of the shopping mall. This thesis explores some of the powerful implications of this shift: 1) the deepening of a consumer culture; 2) a heightening of socio-economic polarity; and 3) the institutionalization of a new form of subtle, omnipresent, largely consensual control. Three key tools of mall design and private management--illusion, exclusion and control--are examined in case studies of two malls in downtown Boston: the urban mall as megastructure, Copley Place; and the "festival marketplace", Faneuil Hall Marketplace. Then, an exemplar of an illusory, exclusionary and controlled environment is presented: Disney World in Orlando, Florida. Finally, a speculative short story, The Mall Society in 2038,is presented, illustrating the potential society that could develop given the continued mallification of our socio-spatial environment.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityDaniel J. Glenn.en_US
dc.format.extent145 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleThe mall society : illusion, exclusion, and control in the urban centeren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20654546en_US


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