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dc.contributor.advisorAlan J. Grodzinsky.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAvedillo, Jose Enriqueen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T18:07:47Z
dc.date.available2012-10-26T18:07:47Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74422
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 39-40).en_US
dc.description.abstractNearly 21 million Americans are affected by osteoarthritis, a complex disease characterized by degenerative lesions to the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the joints. The complexity of the disease makes the use of human models impractical and complicated. Therefore, various animal models have been developed to study the progression of OA and possible therapeutic techniques. Of those models, mouse models play an integral part because of their cost-effectiveness, favorable logistics, and ability to be genetically manipulated. Three main mouse models were reviewed: (1) genetic deletion, (2) treadmill running, and (3) surgically induced injuries. Several strains of knockout mice have been develop in the past 10 years and they provide a great opportunity to study the evolution of OA. Up until now, treatment for OA has been pain management-related, but the development of more advanced mouse models has laid out the framework for possible OA preventing and repairing techniques.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jose Enrique Avedillo.en_US
dc.format.extent40 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleMouse models of osteoarthritis and joint injuryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc813044784en_US


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