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dc.contributor.advisorRanko Bon.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIsenstadt, Samuel M. (Samuel Marc)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-19T19:05:52Z
dc.date.available2012-11-19T19:05:52Z
dc.date.copyright1985en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74769
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Arch.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1985.en_US
dc.descriptionMICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND ROTCH.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 92-99).en_US
dc.description.abstractPrincipal assumptions are made during the early stage of the design process, fixing 70% to 80% of total building costs and most of a building's architectural and environmental qualities. The demands of any one constraint impose a whole set of assumptions that often result in a design that is satisfactory along only a few dimensions. Ruling out many alternatives at a stroke, such assumptions relieve the architect from exhaustively reviewing variations by removing opportunities from consideration. Both the power and crudeness of assumptions increase as constraints multiply and conflict. Having the ability to quickly and thoroughly evaluate assumptions and their consequences would allow architects to intelligently challenge and reform those assumptions and, as a result, to explore a broader range of possibilities for any particular design. This is particularly important in complex projects where the architect's primary role may be to orchestrate experts. This role is not insignificant, for the experts' recommendations will necessarily be bounded by their own concerns and will often conflict. The architect must assign values to design consequences and must provide the assumptions that the experts will base their recommendations on. The architect, then, focuses on making assumptions and interpreting evaluations. But assumptions are of ten outside analysis; rules of thumb, based on experience, generally prevail. Knowledge- based computer expert systems are a promising path of research for the support of conscious and explicit assumption-making. The crucial question for this technology and the central topic of this thesis is how to structure knowledge for use in such a system. My primary goal is to offer a representation of the knowledge involved in window design (a simpler and somewhat isolable subset of building design), a representation comprehensive enough to be useful, but also flexible enough to support differing design processes and decision sequences.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Samuel Isenstadt.en_US
dc.format.extent99 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleThe expedition of expertise : designing an expert system for designen_US
dc.title.alternativeDesigning an expert system for designen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc13150990en_US


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