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dc.contributor.advisorChryssostomos Chryssostomidis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPoulin, Jason Ericen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-19T19:20:07Z
dc.date.available2012-11-19T19:20:07Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/74938
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 104-107).en_US
dc.description.abstractAutomated Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Technology has come a long way in the past decade. Due to advances in batteries and telecommunications, unmanned underwater vehicles no longer require a tether to a mother ship for power, command and control. AUV endurance and range, however, are still limited by the size and capacity of the onboard batteries. Attempts to overcome this limitation, with studies utilizing fuel and solar cells were developed to augment the stored energy onboard. This thesis examines the viability of utilizing an internal combustion engine as an onboard generator to recharge the batteries in during the mission in order to increase both range and endurance. Working in conjunction with the MIT Rapid Development Group, an onboard generating system was developed utilizing a gasoline generator. This system was incorporated into in a clean sheet propulsion system design of a long range AUV propulsion system. Maximum efficiency of all components was stressed at every point in the design process in order to decrease the propulsion system power requirements. Advanced lithium-ion battery systems were also investigated in order to find a system that balanced maximal energy storage with low recharge time. The study resulted in a theoretical AUV propulsion system that could traverse distances that span the Atlantic Ocean at a speed of 2 kts. It is believed that this type of AUV would be ideal for both scientific research and military applications.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jason Eric Poulin.en_US
dc.format.extent133 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleConcept design of a long range AUV propulsion system with an onboard electrical generatoren_US
dc.title.alternativeConcept design of a long range Automated Underwater Vehicle propulsion system with an onboard electrical generatoren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc815961818en_US


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