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dc.contributor.advisorEdwin L. Thomas.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJia, Lin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-07T19:05:50Z
dc.date.available2013-01-07T19:05:50Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/75844
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 130-147).en_US
dc.description.abstractA central pillar of real-world engineering is controlled molding of different types of waves (such as optical and acoustic waves). The impact of these wave-molding devices is directly dependent on the level of wave control they enable. Recently, artificially structured metamaterials have emerged, offering unprecedented flexibility in manipulating waves. The design and fabrication of these metamaterials are keys to the next generation of real-world engineering. This thesis aims to integrate computer science, materials science, and physics to design novel metamaterials and functional devices for photonics and nanotechnology, and translate these advances into realworld applications. Parallel finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and finite element analysis (FEA) programs are developed to investigate a wide range of problems, including optical micromanipulation of biological systems [1, 2], 2-pattern photonic crystals [3], integrated optical circuits on an optical chip [4], photonic quasicrystals with the most premier photonic properties to date [5], plasmonics [6], and structure-property correlation analysis [7], multiple-exposure interference lithography [8], and the world's first searchable database system for nanostructures [9].en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Lin Jia.en_US
dc.format.extent147 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleImpact of morphology and scale on the physical properties of periodic/quasiperiodic micro- and nano- structuresen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc820835851en_US


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