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dc.contributor.advisorChristopher Schuh.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFigueroa, Oscar, IIIen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-07T21:34:49Z
dc.date.available2013-01-07T21:34:49Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/76179
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 39).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the last few decades, nanocrystalline metals have been of increasing interest. Their ability to show increased yield strength and uniform structure show them to be potentially useful in many applications. Additionally, nanocrystalline metals have become more easily manufactured in recent years, allowing for more testing and more use within industrial settings. However, nanocrystalline metals are still highly unstable, mainly due to temperature related growth. Grain boundary segregation is one way in which materials can keep nano length-scale grains. This process involves metal alloys that preferentially segregate the alloying material to the grain boundaries, potentially leading to Grain Boundary Embrittlement (GBE). Using an ideal work of fracture equation, [gamma] = 2[sigma]s - [sigma]g, the energy required to fracture nanocrystalline metal alloys was obtained, and predicted grain stability. Fracture toughness data is also calculated and compared. A contrast between bulk and nanocrystalline alloys is then made, showing benefits to the use of either set of materials for specific alloy functions.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Oscar Figueroa, III.en_US
dc.format.extent39 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleVariations in grain boundary segregation for nanocrystalline stability and strengthen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc821070517en_US


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