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dc.contributor.advisorCharles G. Sodini.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDelano, Margaret Ken_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-13T21:23:25Z
dc.date.available2013-02-13T21:23:25Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/76811
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 101-102).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, a low-power, wearable monitoring system was developed from discrete electronic components and custom PCBs. The device was designed to maximize comfort and minimize the footprint on the user. A single lead, clinical grade electrocardiogram (ECG), along with 3 axes of acceleration are recorded while a user wearing the device carries out his/her daily activities. The monitor itself consists of a central PCB that contains an electrode and the majority of the electronics, along with either one or two additional electrodes that are connected to smaller electrode PCBs. The monitor can be configured such that any given electrode can act as an input or an output. The system can record ECG and acceleration for over 1 week and consumes 7.3 mW. To confirm the quality of the ECG recorded by the device, a clinical test was performed. Individuals wore both the device discussed in this thesis and a clinical ECG recorder while engaging in physical activities such as sitting, standing, and running. Four participants have been tested at this time. QRS sensitivity and QRS positive predictability were determined for each ECG trace. The cardiac monitor outperformed the clinical recorder in all interventions. It should be a viable alternative toen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Margaret (Maggie) K. Delano.en_US
dc.format.extent102 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleA long term wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement systemen_US
dc.title.alternativeLong term wearable ECG measurement systemen_US
dc.title.alternativeLong term wearable electrocardiogram measurement systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc824151339en_US


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