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dc.contributor.advisorMichael J. Driscoll and Eugene Shwageraus.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFei, Tingzhouen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T15:17:01Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T15:17:01Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/76915
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 222-227).en_US
dc.description.abstractSodium Fast Reactors are one of the three candidates of GEN-IV fast reactors. Fast reactors play an important role in saving uranium resources and reducing nuclear wastes. Conventional fast reactors rely on transuranic fuels from reprocessing facilities, which are not available in the U.S. Thus, deployment of fast reactors requires decoupling from reprocessing facilities. This motivates the design and deployment of Uranium Startup sodium Fast Reactors (USFR) on a once-through fuel cycle in order to facilitate the transition to fast reactors by reducing their plant costs and increase capacity factor. Three different fuel types including uranium carbide (UC), metal (UZr) and uranium oxide (UO₂) are investigated and analyzed using the ERANOS code for potential use in USFR designs. A key enabling factor is use of high-albedo MgO or Zr reflectors in place of fertile blankets to reduce uranium enrichment and improve non-proliferation resistance. The different compositions in different fuel types result in different neutronic performance. The softer spectrum and lower allowable fuel volume fractions of oxide fuel have shorter fuel cycle length due to reactivity constraints, whereas fast neutron fluence plays an important role in determining the fuel cycle length in metal cores due to the harder spectrum. Moderators are deliberately added in the metal fuels to lower the fast neutron fluence. Carbide cores have a slightly harder neutron spectrum than oxide cores and a larger achievable fuel volume fraction. USFRs using all three fuel types (UC, U0 2 and UZr) have lower fuel cycle cost (6.27, 6.09 and 5.77mills/kWhe) and comparable uranium consumption (0.50, 0.55, and 0.53kgNatU/MWde) compared with typical LWRs (6.39nills/kWhe and 0.53kgNatU/MWde). All USFR designs have maximum neutron fluence below 5E23n/cm². All three USFR designs have pressure drop below 0.7MPa and maximum temperature below the limit for each fuel type. Both carbide and metal fuel have excellent passive safety performance. It is concluded that the USFR approach is a competitive way to accelerate fast reactor development.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Tingzhou Fei.en_US
dc.format.extent283 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectNuclear Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleInnovative design of uranium startup fast reactorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc824161437en_US


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