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dc.contributor.advisorJohn D. E. Gabrieli.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSaygin, Zeynep Mevhibeen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-13T15:55:15Z
dc.date.available2013-03-13T15:55:15Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/77843
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis. Page 125 blank.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe integration of anatomical, functional, and developmental approaches in cognitive neuroscience is essential for generating mechanistic explanations of brain function. In this thesis, I first establish a proof-of-principle that neuroanatomical connectivity, as measured with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), can be used to calculate connectional fingerprints that are sufficient to delineate fine anatomical distinctions in the human brain (Chapter 2). Next, I describe the maturation of structural connectivity patterns by applying these connectional fingerprints to over a hundred participants ranging from five to thirty years of age, and show that these connectional patterns have different developmental trajectories (Chapter 3). I then illustrate how anatomical connections may shape (or in turn be shaped by) function and behavior, within the framework of reading ability and describe how white matter tract integrity may predict future acquisition of reading ability in children (Chapter 4). I conclude by summarizing how these experiments offer testable hypotheses of the maturation of structure and function. Studying the complex interplay between structure, function, and development will get us closer to understanding both the constraints present at birth, and the effect of experience, on the biological mechanisms underlying brain function.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Zeynep Mevhibe Saygin.en_US
dc.format.extent125 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectBrain and Cognitive Sciences.en_US
dc.titleStructure-function relationships in human brain developmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc827831507en_US


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