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Browsing Theses - Linguistics and Philosophy by Issue Date

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Browsing Theses - Linguistics and Philosophy by Issue Date

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  • Kern, Gretchen (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    This dissertation broadens our understanding of a typology of poetic rhyme through the analysis of three rhyming traditions that show unconventional patterns in the contents, position, and size of rhyme domains. The rhyme ...
  • Levin, Theodore Frank (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    Abstract Case is a conjectured syntactic property of noun phrases that accounts for aspects of their distribution and form that do not otherwise follow from their PF and LF content (Chomsky 1981, 1986; Chomsky & Lasnik ...
  • Evans, Owain Rhys (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    This thesis is about learning the preferences of humans from observations of their choices. It builds on work in economics and decision theory (e.g. utility theory, revealed preference, utilities over bundles), Machine ...
  • Schumacher, Melissa Renée (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    This work addresses questions about causation and evidence: How can we learn what causes what? Can we get evidence for objects that don't cause anything? And what is the evidential relationship between events in a causal ...
  • Lenehan, Rose (Rose Elizabeth) (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    Slurs have recently received a great deal of attention from philosophers of language. They are thought to be special in both their linguistic properties and their rhetorical effects-that is, in both what they mean and what ...
  • Salow, Bernhard, 1988- (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    Can we always tell, just through reflection, what we should believe? That is the question of access, the central disagreement between epistemic internalists and externalists, and the focus of the dissertation. Chapter 1 ...
  • Urk, Coppe van (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    This dissertation argues that all instances of phrasal movement are the result of Agree and Merge (Chomsky 1995, 2001), and, in addition to this, that the existence of different types of movement derives solely from variation ...
  • Uegaki, Wataru, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    Abstract This dissertation concerns three kinds of variability that pose challenges for the compositional semantics of question-embedding sentences: (i) lexical variation among clause-embedding predicates with respect to ...
  • Gould, Isaac, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015)
    In this thesis I explore the role of ambiguous evidence in first language acquisition by using a probabilistic learner for setting syntactic parameters. As ambiguous evidence is input to the learner that is compatible with ...
  • Jones, Patrick Jackson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    This dissertation develops a constraint-based analysis of opaque tonal interactions in Kinande verb forms and, based on this analysis, argues for a phonological architecture that incorporates both cyclic evaluation and ...
  • Imanishi, Yusuke (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    In this thesis, I propose the hypothesis that ergative Case in certain languages may be assigned to a DP which would be otherwise Case-less within a certain domain. In this sense, ergative Case appears to be a default. At ...
  • Nikolaeva, Liudmila, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    This thesis explores the relationship between anaphora and movement on a wide array of data primarily from Russian. I argue that anaphors and pronominals are underlyingly the same syntactic entity, an index, whereas ...
  • Horowitz, Sophie Pilloo (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    Any non-skeptical epistemological theory should hold that, if we want to know what the world is like, our best bet is to believe what our evidence supports. Evidence is a guide to truth. Though it might sound like a ...
  • Erlewine, Michael Yoshitaka (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    This dissertation investigates the consequences of overt and covert movement on association with focus. The interpretation of focus-sensitive operators such as only and even depends on the presence of a focused constituent ...
  • Podobryaev, Alexander (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    This dissertation is about person features, their representation and interpretation in natural language. I will argue that there are several ways in which person features can be represented and interpreted. Most importantly, ...
  • Brohan, Anthony (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    The representation, content and learning of phonotactic constraints has spurred a lot of recent research phonology. This work concerns the constraints involved in the representation of place-based coocurrence restrictions. ...
  • Nonato, Rafael (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    In this thesis I ponder over a constellation of phenomena that revolve around switch reference and coordination, drawing mainly on their instantiation in Kisedje (Je, Brazil). I start by investigating Klsedje's case system. ...
  • Howard, Edwin Martin (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    This paper concerns itself with the superlative morpheme -est and its ability to license Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) such as any or ever, and in particular the compositional analysis of a puzzling type of utterance which ...
  • Kotek, Hadas (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014)
    This dissertation motivates a new syntax and semantics for simplex and multiple wh-questions, concentrating on English and German data. The proposed theory combines Cable's (2007; 2010) Q-based syntax for wh-movement and ...
  • Ivlieva, Natalia (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2013)
    This dissertation explores the role of scalar implicatures in the grammar of plurality and disjunction. I argue that scalar implicatures are relevant not only for the meaning of plurals and disjunctions, but also for their ...
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