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dc.contributor.advisorRandall Davis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Jeremy (Jeremy Kenneth)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-12T19:27:12Z
dc.date.available2013-04-12T19:27:12Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/78470
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 85-86).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, we present PhysInk, a sketching application that provides a natural way to describe physical structure and behavior to a computer. The user describes structure by sketching physical objects and constraints on a canvas backed by a 2D physics engine. The user can then move the objects to explicitly demonstrate physical behavior and can utter simple speech commands to label objects and events. These interactions are captured in PhysInk's timeline - a causal graph of physical events - which is used to build a deeper understanding of behavior. The events capture the geometry of movement and contact between objects, while the timeline captures the causal relationships between events. Capturing behavior in this framework enables a more intelligent conversation with the user about function. First, it enables assisted editing, where PhysInk propagates the user's edits of behavior through the timeline in order to maintain a logical sequence of events at all times. Second, it allows users to produce a physically-realistic simulation of the behavior that they have described. These features demonstrate the usefulness and depth that the timeline offers as a knowledge representation for behavior, making PhysInk the first in a new class of design tools that focuses on function, as well as form.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jeremy Scott.en_US
dc.format.extent86 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleUnderstanding sketch-and-speech descriptions of machinesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc834089349en_US


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