Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMitchel Resnick.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Karen A. (Karen Ann)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T19:03:09Z
dc.date.available2013-06-17T19:03:09Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/79157
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, February 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis. "February 2013."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 209-219).en_US
dc.description.abstractWe live in a computational culture - a culture in which we are surrounded by computational systems and interfaces, from social networks to banking infrastructure, to entertainment platforms, to transportation systems. This culture introduces new expectations and new opportunities for learning, creating new demands for what to learn and offering new possibilities for how to learn. In this dissertation, I adopt a predominantly qualitative approach to exploring learning in computational culture, studying how the Scratch programming environment and online community are employed to support learning both in and out of school. To this end, I conducted interviews with 30 kids working with Scratch at home and 30 teachers working with Scratch in K-12 classrooms to develop descriptions of computational creation in these two settings. Using a theoretical framework of agency and structure, I analyze how the at-home and school-classroom contexts enable - or constrain - young people's agency in computational creation. Despite common assumptions that at-home learning is necessarily low-structure/high-agency and that at-school learning is necessarily high-structure/low-agency, I argue that structure and agency need not be in opposition. Designers of learning environments should explore intermediate possibilities, finding ways to employ structure in the service of learner agency.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Karen A. Brennan.en_US
dc.format.extent232 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.titleBest of both worlds : issues of structure and agency in computational creation, in and out of schoolen_US
dc.title.alternativeIssues of structure and agency in computational creation, in and out of schoolen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc847525655en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record