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dc.contributor.advisorPattie Maes.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCoelho, Marceloen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-17T19:54:37Z
dc.date.available2013-06-17T19:54:37Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/79305
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, February 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. "September 2012."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 141-148).en_US
dc.description.abstractAt the boundary between people, objects and spaces, we encounter a broad range of surfaces. Their properties perform functional roles such as permeability, comfort or illumination, while conveying information such as an object's affordances, composition, or history of use. However, today surfaces are static and can neither adapt to our changing needs, nor communicate dynamic information and sense user input. As technology advances and we progress towards a world imbued with programmable materials, how will designers create physical surfaces that are adaptive and can take full advantage of our sensory apparatus? This dissertation looks at this question through the lens of a three-tier methodology consisting of the development of programmable composites; their application in design and architecture; and contextualization through a broader material and surface taxonomy. The focus is placed primarily on how materials and their aggregate surface properties can be used to engage our senses. A series of design probes and four final implementations are presented, each addressing specific programmable material and surface properties. Surflex, Sprout 1/O, and Shutters are continuous surfaces which can change shape to modify their topology, texture and permeability, and Six-Forty by Four-Eighty is a light-emitting display surface composed of autonomous and reconfigurable physical pixels. The technical and conceptual objectives of these designs are evaluated through exhibitions in a variety of public spaces, such as museums, galleries, fairs, as well as art and design festivals. This dissertation seeks to provide contributions on multiple levels, including: the development of techniques for the creation and control of programmable surfaces; the definition of a vocabulary and taxonomy to describe and compare previous work in this area; and finally, uncovering design principles for the underlying development of future programmable surface aesthetics.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Marcelo Coelho.en_US
dc.format.extent148 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.titleMaterializing interactionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc847625842en_US


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