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dc.contributor.advisorDonald Rosenfield and Josef Oehmen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLenis, Aliciaen_US
dc.contributor.otherLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-25T14:56:10Z
dc.date.available2013-09-25T14:56:10Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/81162
dc.descriptionThesis (M.B.A.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; in conjunction with the Leaders for Global Operations Program at MIT, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 83-84).en_US
dc.description.abstractAs multinational industrial goods companies (MNCs) selling low-volume high-complexity products move into markets across the globe, they develop an operations strategy to provide a product tailored to local markets, often also engineered and manufactured in that local market. As MNCs seek to provide more customization to their customers, they face issues with the resulting complexity of operations, leading them to pursue mass customization, i.e. providing variety at low cost through configurable products. An important step in this product strategy is the introduction of product configurators, i.e. software tools that permit the automatic or semiautomatic configuration and pricing of product variants. Through streamlining the specification and bidding process, product configurators lower process time and therefore also lower costs in both sales and engineering functions. However, difficulties arise in developing a product configurator for a global company operating in many different localized markets. This study develops a framework for multinational companies to first evaluate the needs of their overseas divisions for a product configurator and second identify the gaps between the global and local product configuration and pricing. The objective of the framework is to provide a unified, centrally managed product configurator that provides the ability to tailor product options to specific local needs. A case study of a power electronics multinational with 9 overseas locations is performed. Interviews of key stakeholders in the head office and in the overseas division provide preliminary indication of differing product configurator design requirements from country to country. A deep dive is performed using the framework into two of its oversea divisions, Canada and Brazil. The study reveals key differences in the product feature requirements, in costing products due to local labor costs, part costs and import taxes, in the pricing process due to margin structures and sales incentives and in usage patterns due to language, local technical terminology and collaboration modes between sales and engineering. Using survey techniques, prioritization of the configurator functionality requirements is determined. Combined with an organizational analysis of the company, an integrated implementation plan is developed to permit identification of solutions in conjunction with roll-out to the international organization.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alicia Lenis.en_US
dc.format.extent87 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.titleDeveloping product configurators for use in a multinational industrial goods companyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeM.B.A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeaders for Global Operations Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management
dc.identifier.oclc857789826en_US


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