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dc.contributor.advisorMichael Ricard and Jerod Ketcham.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLaun, Alexander Walter, Ensignen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-24T17:34:33Z
dc.date.available2013-10-24T17:34:33Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/81608
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M. in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (S.M. in Ocean Engineering)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 74-76).en_US
dc.description.abstractWith a renewed focus on the Asia-Pacific region, the United States Navy will increasingly rely on high-endurance unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) to support successful operations in a challenging threat environment. Undoubtedly, this naval strategy will necessitate versatile UUV systems that fulfill a broad spectrum of customer-generated requirements. This thesis presents a unique approach to the conceptual design process for UUVs, thereby allowing strategic decision-makers to rapidly explore a given design space. The proposed MATLAB-based conceptual design program features five primary modules: a mission module, a hull module, a resistance module, a battery module, and a pressure vessel module. The final concept design results from an iterative process that considers the displacement, interior volume, and exterior volume of the total UUV system. To validate the proposed design algorithm, the author applied the best practices of modern naval architecture, marine engineering, ocean engineering, systems engineering, and submersible design. Model test data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software were used to validate the empirical equations selected for the resistance module. The pressure vessel module, including a genetic algorithm to generate viable scantlings, was validated by a consideration of manually optimized pressure vessel designs. Ultimately, this thesis demonstrates the sufficiency, reliability, and versatility of the proposed conceptual design program for UUVs.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alexander Walter Laun.en_US
dc.format.extent76 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleDevelopment and validation of a conceptual design program for unmanned underwater vehiclesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Ocean Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc858871322en_US


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