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dc.contributor.advisorKaren R. Polenske.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, Yang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-24T17:36:39Z
dc.date.available2013-10-24T17:36:39Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/81627
dc.descriptionThesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 35-37).en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is now common knowledge that China's data is bad, and China's environment is polluted. In this paper I develop a simple pollution intensity index to test China's existing national and local environmental data, to answer the questions: "Bad" how? "Polluted" why? And finally: what can be done? I find that China's existing data is rudimentary, piecemeal, and inaccurate. I find that government data is not detailed, not transparent, and that non-governmental attempts at improving data quality and transparency are hamstringed by lack of official support. These data quality and transparency issues contribute to the intractability of China's industrial pollution. I also find that a pollution intensity index, like the one I develop and test in this study, can help policymakers identify pollution hotspots years before the hotspots worsen into public health emergencies. By running 2010 data through a simple algorithm, I isolate a pollution hotspot that took the Chinese government until 2013 to discover without this framework. I show that better and more accurate data, along with a mandate for continuous monitoring and analysis, can shift the current strategy from pollution control to pollution prevention, ultimately saving time, money, and lives.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Yang Chu.en_US
dc.format.extent49 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleChina Urban Pollution Information Disclosure Study (CUPIDS) : socioeconomic implications of dirty industry and a guide to national cleandustrializationen_US
dc.title.alternativeSocioeconomic implications of dirty industry and a guide to national cleandustrializationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc859158465en_US


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